Faster than the speed of purr

Classified: kitten eyes only

Experiment with the ‘purr boom’. This effect occurs when a purr is processing faster than a kitten.  Conscious humans (see previous post about difficulties caused by sleeping humans) are extremely susceptible to this effect. By deploying boss kitten as the purrer, I am able to remain observing. The ‘purees’ have been observed looking for the purrer before she even enters the room, reaching for treat packets and lowering their hands to ground level in preparation to provide tummy rubs and stroking. Actions do not appear conscious by the human, and I must suspect that some primal instinct in their brain responds to the passage of the purr boom. Most useful.

Of course, these notes must not fall into human hands, already they are growing wise to the components of a purr and one meddlesome scientist has started to identify the bit that makes humans feed us.

Human Auditory Prompt

Saturday

Lab notes: Have recently noticed disturbing trend towards deafness in humans whilst in their bed. They definitely know I am there, but do not seem to hear my purrs or reasonable requests for food or access to the outdoors. Situation especially severe if the noise box in the corner of their room has not started beeping.

Hypothesis: humans needs trigger noises to become able to hear. Purring ineffectual, must test other sounds to find alternative to beeping box.

Test day 1: Urination in corner of room – extremely effective. Near instantaneous reaction to the sound and acknowledgement of my needs.

However, standard lab conditions jeopardised by washing of carpet and moving of furniture to deny access to my experimental area. Shall have to formulate alternate approach for tomorrow. Or maybe they will be more sensitised and respond to purring without additional prompts.

Human Auditory Prompt

Saturday

Lab notes: Have recently noticed disturbing trend towards deafness in humans whilst in their bed. They definitely know I am there, but do not seem to hear my purrs or reasonable requests for food or access to the outdoors. Situation especially severe if the noise box in the corner of their room has not started beeping.

Hypothesis: humans needs trigger noises to become able to hear. Purring ineffectual, must test other sounds to find alternative to beeping box.

Test day 1: Urination in corner of room – extremely effective. Near instantaneous reaction to the sound and acknowledgement of my needs.

However, standard lab conditions jeopardised by washing of carpet and moving of furniture to deny access to my experimental area. Shall have to formulate alternate approach for tomorrow. Or maybe they will be more sensitised and respond to purring without additional prompts.